Meet Chad

Life Coach, Trainer, and Keynote Speaker

 

Coaching and Training

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What Team CH Can Do for You

 

On April 3, 2001, Chad was involved in a serious accident, leaving him a quadriplegic. But Chad’s dreams were not paralyzed that day; as you can see below, he’s kept himself busy:

 • He started Chad Hymas Communications, Inc., a professional speaking company designed to motivate businesses and corporations to “use their wings and reach seemingly impossible heights.”

• The Wall Street Journal calls Chad Hymas one of the 10 most inspirational people in the world! Click here and read the article where Chad was featured.

• At 37 years of age, Chad is the youngest person ever to receive the CPAE award and be inducted into the National Speaker Hall of Fame.

• Last year, Chad spoke at 220 different events, traveling just over 300,000 miles and speaking on five continents and in four countries.

• Chad has shared his personal message and entertained many audiences from organizations such as Wells Fargo, Blue Cross Blue Shield, Ford, IHC, Coca-Cola, and the Utah Jazz.

• He is a member of the National Speakers Association and is a CSP (certified speaking professional), a designation achieved by fewer than 8% in the speaking industry.

• He served as president of the National Speakers Association Utah chapter.

• Chad maintains his hobby and dream of managing a5100-acree elk preserve with his father, Kelly.

• He has raced in marathons and, in the summer of 2003, set a world record by wheeling his chair from Salt Lake City to Las Vegas (513 miles). Click Here to read more about this record-setting event.

• Chad participates in other wheelchair athletic competitions, including basketball, rugby, and officiating basketball (a dream come true).

• He spends many hours with other injured individuals in therapy, encouraging them to overcome their challenges, focus on dreams and make them a reality, and love life for all that it has to offer. To achieve the unachievable and to reach for the unreachable.

• Chad’s greatest accomplishment is that he remains a devoted husband to his loving wife, Shondell, and a proud father to their three children, Christian, Kyler, and Gracee! Click here to read more about Gracee.

 

“We do this particular kickoff event as a team each year and have done so for the last five years. Without exception, everyone said that your part of the meeting had the most positive effect on them of any session or speaker we’ve ever had.”

T-Mobile

T-Mobile

“In the years that I have been in this organization, I have never seen a standing ovation given to one of our speakers. It’s tough to impress or to move this group and when I saw the spontaneous eruption of applause while everyone got to their feet, I knew I was seeing something very special.”

YPO Florida

YPO Florida

“Wow, what a powerful presentation! I had one of our powerful CEOs approach me and say, ‘I haven’t cried in 25 years, and I was balling like a baby.’ In my profession, I have the privilege of listening to and entertaining some of the best speakers around. You were the very best. Thank you for being a real-life hero.”

Corporate Alliance

Corporate Alliance

“In the past 10, years we have had a variety of safety professionals address our employees. However, no one has made such a lasting impression as you did in 90 short minutes. Thank you for emphasizing why we need to be safe at home and at work each and every day: for our families.”

Kraft Pizza

Kraft Pizza

Facebook Posts

3 hours ago

Chad Hymas

19 years ago while in the hospital trying to breathe in my condition was like deep sea diving with a leaky air hose. Then insult is added to injury. They reverse the process, so they can vacuum out mucus from my lungs. They use a forced water vacuum system – sort of like the one used to clean your carpets.

The nurse pushes a water tube inside the breathing tube that is already in place. Without resistance, it slides down my throat and into a lung. The nurse turns on what feels like a fire hydrant and floods that lung with warm sterile water. She then reverses the process and sucks out the water along with all the junk that has collected in there over the last few hours. My eyes beg for mercy – to no avail. As I contemplate all my past sins in preparation for sure death from drowning, she floods the other lung.

Every three hours, I drown – literally, horribly, drown. Can you imagine a couple of gallons of water being poured into your lungs? It exceeds your worst nightmare. Repeated four to eight times a day, this procedure is as necessary as it is miserable. The pain and panic of drowning is not reduced by my numbness and paralysis. I feel every bit of it. I am positive I am going to die. I really would die if it took any longer than it does. I believe it. My body knows it.

My brother Brian is in the room one afternoon when the nurse instigates this procedure. As she floods the first lung, my body suddenly convulses and goes into involuntary spasms. It is exceptionally painful, even today, when these spasms happen. It is actually more like pressure – huge pressure – a monstrous vice clamping down on my chest. I can’t breathe. I can’t think. My body becomes an alien creature out of control.

After the procedure, I am traumatized, in residual pain and panic – harboring real fear for the next time this will happen – which will be in another three hours. Brian is as traumatized as I am – maybe more so. Witnessing a loved one’s pain is usually far more difficult than dealing with your own.

The procedure lasts less than a minute, but it is pure Hell.
Hell is sometimes essential to healing.

Brian goes to the nurses’ station and pleads with them to give me something to relieve my agony and panic. They gently explain to him that, although this procedure is an awful experience, it is too dangerous to drug me. I am barely alive, and they can’t risk taking me down any further. I am near the bottom already, and at the very bottom lies death.

Brian returns to my room, lays his head on my shoulder and weeps. If I could stroke my brother’s head or pat his arm to show how much I appreciate his being there for me, I would. My brother’s love and compassion calm me more than any medication could.
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9 hours ago

Chad Hymas

Today's Belief- Continue to love. Continue to forgive. Continue to grow. ... See MoreSee Less

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1 day ago

Chad Hymas

The first police officer reaches under the one-ton bale of hay and attempts to lift it off of me. Of course, it doesn’t budge. He grabs his flashlight and shines it under the hay into my face. I blink. He yells over his shoulder to his partner, “He’s alive! He’s alive! Help me move the hay.”

Even working together two officers can’t move it – not a fraction of an inch. A thousand pounds each? Of course they can’t move it. “Cut the strings,” I whisper. My voice is weak. They can’t hear me.

I am not going to last much longer. If they will just cut the strings, the bale will break apart, and they can drag me out of here.
“Lift, Joe, lift!”
“Just cut the strings,” I mumble, “Please cut the strings.”
“C’mon harder.”
“It’s too heavy! We can’t lift it. We gotta go for help! Hang on Chad, we’ll be right back!”

I am alone again in the growing darkness. Wonderful painless, peaceful, irresistible sleep beckons. I struggle to remain conscious. One. Two. Three. Four… Where are they? How long does it take for police, fire, ambulance, to arrive? Where is the Coast Guard? Where are the Marines?Where is that one old farmer with enough common sense to just cut the strings?

The desert air grows chilly as the sky darkens. I grow weaker. Dizziness overcomes me and I begin to drift off into that gray space somewhere between the living and the dead.

Help finally arrives. One of the police officers bends down so I can see his face. “Hold on! A fire engine is here. There are six men aboard.”
I do the math. Two big, strong cops and six burly firemen must move a ton of dead weight off me. That’s two hundred forty five pounds each. No way can they possibly do that – but somehow, miraculously, they do. A couple of neighbors who have arrived at the scene stand by to catch me. They lower my limp body to the ground where I lie in a broken heap.

Why didn’t they cut the strings? They could have saved a long, tortured hour. How heavy is hay? A piece of hay is about the weight of a feather. How many pieces of hay does it take to make two thousand pounds? Lots. That package of sixteen bazillion individual pieces of hay wrapped in a gigantic bundle is a crushing weight. But separated, it would have been nothing.

I feel bad saying this, because it makes me sound ungrateful – and I am very grateful to the guys who saved my life that night – but there is a point to be made here, isn’t there?
Is it too big?
Is it overwhelming?

Cut the strings – just cut the strings!

Are you buried under crushing burdens? Projects that are too huge? Schedules that are too complicated? Maybe you are trying to do too much at once – trying to do everything instead of doing something.

Cut the strings and cut yourself free. Do one thing at a time – and get it DOne. Move “out of the strain of the doing into the peace of the done.”
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