Sep 20, 2021 / by OsmondMarketing / No Comments

The Agreement on Straddling Fish Stocks (the Agreement on the Implementation of the Provisions of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea of 10 December 1982 concerning the Conservation and Management of Straddling Fish Stocks and Highly Migratory Fish Stocks) is a multilateral treaty established by the United Nations to improve the cooperative management of fishery resources in large areas. and are of economic and environmental importance to a number of nations. As of December 2016, the treaty has been ratified by 91 parties, including 90 states and the European Union. [2] Straddling stocks are fish stocks that migrate through more than one exclusive economic zone or are in more than one exclusive economic zone. The agreement was adopted in 1995 and entered into force in 2001. [1] The Agreement seeks to achieve this objective by establishing a framework for cooperation in the conservation and management of these resources. It promotes good governance in the oceans through the effective management and conservation of the resources of the high seas, including by establishing detailed international minimum standards for the conservation and management of straddling fish stocks and highly migratory fish stocks; ensure that measures for the conservation and management of these stocks are compatible and coherent in areas of national sovereignty and adjacent high seas; Ensure that there are effective mechanisms for the implementation and implementation of these measures on the high seas; and recognizing the specific conservation and management needs of developing countries, as well as development and participation in fisheries for the two types of stocks mentioned above. The high-migratory fish is a term that has its origin in the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. It concerns fish species that carry out ocean migrations and also have a wide geographical coverage, and generally refers to tuna and tuna species, shark, marlin and swordfish.

interterritorial fish stocks are particularly vulnerable to overfishing due to inefficient management regimes and non-respect of fisheries interests. . . .